Craig Groeschel Giving And Receiving Feedback Part 1 Pdf

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The Craig Groeschel Leadership Podcast offers personal, practical coaching lessons that take the mystery out of leadership. In each episode of the Craig Groeschel Leadership Podcast, Craig brings you empowering insights and easy-to-understand takeaways you can use to lead yourself and lead your team. Learn to break the cycle of negative thinking in your life with this sneak peek of Craig Groeschel's newest book, Winning the War in Your Mind: Change Your Thinking, Change Your Life, out now everywhere books are sold.

Church, an American evangelical multi-site church with locations in ten U. Church Loaded is not the owner of any of the sermons , we uploaded them on our platform to spread the word of God at large. Any of the Craig Groeschel Sermons can be deleted from our website once we receive report from the rightful owners.

Your generosity brings The Global Leadership Summit to more communities worldwide. Learn how you can equip, encourage and inspire Christian influencers globally by providing the access to leadership tools where needed most. We invite you to follow the Summit around the world and learn about the impact of your donations by reading stories and watching videos about leaders who were inspired and empowered to create change in their communities locally and around the globe. Packed with great talks from a variety of faculty like Craig Groeschel and Albert Tate offering great insights and challenging ideas.

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By Friday I was so depleted. I had nothing left to give. It was just too much for me this week. What difference am I making? Who am I even helping? This job is so not worth it…I am not cut out for this. You ever feel this way? First, I breathed. A lot. Not kidding. You know that feature on your Apple Watch? Meditation is part of my morning routine that I go through as I get ready. I start every morning with a shower then I head to my home office and I use an app called Morning Routine to help me complete my daily routine.

The app will time each part of your routine and reward you with an inspirational quote when you finish a routine. My morning routine includes meditation, devotion, prayer, gratitude, and affirmations.

There were times this week when I did just that—even if it was just in my head. The times where even in my head where I responded with empathy, love, and forgiveness are what got me through to Friday. That was not going to happen, but I could respond in love to someone else. I purposely and intentionally did something nice for someone to give them a boost and it really did help me feel better. By the time the parent called to apologize a couple of days, I was ready to accept it with grace.

There were several times were I leaned into my own negativity and justification. Those times did nothing to advance my own cause and just left me feeling worse. Then to make things worse, I beat myself up for all of it and every other shortcoming I have. One last strategy that I am using in this moment is reflection. For me it helps me to write. If nothing else, it helps me to get past the week before and not dread Monday.

Last week was that kind of week for me. I think my big takeaway is to accept that. It was a bad week. I had times where I responded well to the challenges and times when I could have done better. It is what it is. I also know that every week is not always like that.

Dreading and worrying about what might come at me next week will only ruin my present moment. My biggest successes were when I suspended my judgement and responded with love somehow. By the end of the week my well was completely dry, but I survived. Tomorrow is a new day and next week is a new week. While I have no idea what will hit me, I know I can get through it. Long wavy grass.

Oh no! Each day I go on a bear hunt. My bear is not a literal bear, but definitely may have teeth and claws. I never know what I might find on this daily hunt.

When I come to work each morning my day rises up to greet me in ways in which I would never have dreamed. Some days go as planned. I get in my expected number of walkthroughs, meetings, observations, and then have some time to do reports, paperwork, or planning. Other days the office door is a revolving door of discipline issues, teacher issues, or impromptu planning meetings. This is not even including the stress associated by the event itself. Instead, you needed to provide safe crisis management support all morning for a student.

The event itself is stressful and takes an emotional toll upon you. Couple that with the stress of having 2 hours of work that did not get completed and now the additional paperwork that accompanies the safe crisis management. The stress in compounded. I have come to realize that there is nothing I could have done to prepare for this.

No class, no workshop, no book. There is no genetic or innate trait that would make that statement true or false. There are better or worse ways to handle situations and better or worse ways to think about or frame them.

Somedays my instincts will lead me in the right direction and my training will help with what to do and other times I will make a mistake. Nothing, however, that I have experienced before becoming a principal has prepared me with how to think, react emotionally, and cope. I just have to go through them to become better at using my strategies. No amount of careful planning and strategizing will prevent all problems. No daily devotion or minutes spent in meditation will equip you with the armor to face all situations with grace, confidence and a peaceful spirit.

However, certain tools can help you get through the tough situations and with practice, you can get better at dealing with what comes. You just have to go through it. As I think about the year, I am able to do it today without a sense of judgment, but with a sense of gratitude. I am thankful for the opportunities I was given to learn and grow this year and for the grace of those around me to allow me the space for that growth.

If I can get to the point where I can embrace difficult situations as opportunities to develop skills so that I can support others better, I can move myself from a defensive state to a proactive one.

Instead of focusing on ways to just handle, manage, or deal with situations, I am working towards embracing them as ways to build my leadership skills. I read somewhere that this attitude is like the multi-headed Hydra from Greek Mythology.

I learned this year to frame situations differently. The chaos and unforeseen circumstances that inevitably come with the job of principal do not need to be seen as tests to see if I have what it takes to do the job. While this reflection is not necessarily a bad thing, it in itself is not sufficient, and for me, can easily lead to beating myself up.

With this mindset, I hope this year to not just handle the stressful situations better, but also to use them to build my future leadership. I saw everything from peer editing, QR codes, small group direct-instruction, and computer programs used to provide immediate and frequent feedback to our students.

It was exciting to see! Performance feedback names the response teachers give to the work students are doing, with an expected response within students persistence.

The development of persistence is a key element to performance feedback. The idea of performance feedback developing persistence was not something I had previously given much thought to. This will keep them going and help them to develop persistence. As principals we are the lead learners for our buildings.

We give feedback as part of coaching and evaluating our staff and receive feedback from a variety of sources and stakeholders. As a new principal, I am finding that I have to develop a thick skin and sort through the feedback I receive. Some of it is warranted and helpful, directed at decisions and actions that I need to adjust or improve, and some of it is not so helpful. First I have to sift through whether the feedback is accurate, also taking into account where it is coming from, decide the value I need to place on it, then act accordingly.

Even when feedback is warranted and valuable, if it is based on a mistake I have made, or is directed at me instead of the work, it is hard to take. I can shift to self-beratement pretty quickly.

Teachers have to go through the same processes as they often receive feedback from multiple sources. He tells us that as leaders we should crave feedback. How we internalize the feedback and how it moves us forward or not determines our future actions. So how can we move to a place where we, the leaders, and our students crave feedback?

We focused on the equals side of the equation when considering student learning. We looked at what needs to happen with feedback so that learning can occur Timely and frequent. Considering ourselves as the learners how can we learn from the valuable feedback we receive and the mistakes we make? Craig Groeschel gives us 3 keys:.

Giving and receiving feedback is not easy. I need to chew on the feedback, reflect, and make a plan to move forward. Then I need to see the entire experience not as a negative one, but as one that is helping me to improve my skills. When I began my blog, I was hesitant. I thought if nothing else, I knew I would be able to look back on where I began if I documented my steps along the way.

Recently, this reasoning has been confirmed by a podcast I listened to. They say that this thinking is based on a gap between where you are and where you want to be and that it breeds discontentment.

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EPISODE GIVING AND RECEIVING FEEDBACK, PART 1. EPISODE NOTES. Thank you for joining the Craig Groeschel Leadership Podcast! Without a.


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Ever wondered what it takes to move your church to the next level — how to improve your church — to make it better and more effective to mission? NOTE: This is part 2 of a 3-part blog series on growing the church by improving ministries. In part 1 of the series, we launched just that, setting the stage for creating a culture of continuous improvement. Almost all pastors want to improve the ministries in the church. However, having the intestinal fortitude to look in their own mirror and the mirror of the church and take steps to change what they see, is frequently a huge challenge for them. Until the pastor can say that, nothing substantive is going to change and the church is certainly not going to improve.

Ever wondered what it takes to move your church to the next level — how to improve your church — to make it better and more effective to mission? NOTE: This is part 2 of a 3-part blog series on growing the church by improving ministries. In part 1 of the series, we launched just that, setting the stage for creating a culture of continuous improvement. Almost all pastors want to improve the ministries in the church. However, having the intestinal fortitude to look in their own mirror and the mirror of the church and take steps to change what they see, is frequently a huge challenge for them.

Send feedback. The EntreLeadership Podcast. More at www. Available episodes.

Get the free EPISODE 27: GIVING AND RECEIVING FEEDBACK, PART 1

By Friday I was so depleted. I had nothing left to give.

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